Preaching Analogy

Analogy recognizes that God’s relationship with Israel in the Old Testament is akin to Christ’s relationship with the New Testament Church.[1] This does not mean that the Church has replaced or displaced Israel. However, it does emphasize the divine nature of Christ and His mission to seek and to save the lost. Just as God is the deliverer of Israel, so Jesus is the deliverer of all God’s people, both Jew and Gentile.

To preach by analogy the preacher must show how the identity and saving activity of God in the Old Testament is echoed by Jesus in the New Testament. For example, in Isaiah 54:5-8 God is called Israel’s bridegroom and Israel is called God’s bride. These verses promise that God’s anger against Israel will not persist and that He will come to redeem His people as a husband with love and compassion. In Mark 2:19 Jesus identifies Himself as the bridegroom. In order to understand what Jesus is claiming we must first appreciate the prophetic promise of God in Isaiah. If God is the bridegroom of His people and Jesus is the bridegroom of God’s people, then Jesus is God. Furthermore, Revelation 19:6-8 identifies the Church and all of the saints as the Bride of the Lamb (the Lamb being a typological epithet for Jesus). Therefore, just as God and Israel are bridegroom and bride in Isaiah, so Jesus and the all the saints are bridegroom and bride in the New Testament.

Analogy helps us to resolve the overlapping portrait of God in the Old Testament and Jesus in the New Testament. It also helps us to appreciate like principles and qualities between God’s relationship with His people in the Old Testament, which is mysteriously through Christ, and God’s relationship with His people in the New Testament, which is explicitly through Christ.

[1] Greidanus, Preaching Christ in the Old Testament, 221.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s